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UTMC partners with nonprofit care network

 

The University of Toledo Medical Center partnered with the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network to better serve the people in Toledo suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

               

Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation’s Patient Care Network is a nonprofit organization that provides addiction treatment to patients, according to their website. The foundation already has programs in Minnesota, California, Oregon, Illinois, Florida and New York.

               

In April, UTMC opened a 10-bed, inpatient, acute detox unit for adults ages 18 and older who are addicted to opioids, benzodiazepines and alcohol, said Dr. Tanvir Singh, the unit’s medical director and a physician at UTMC.

               

The purpose of this detox center is to provide immediate care for drug-addicted patients and to stabilize withdrawal symptoms. The unit has admitted approximately 360 patients in the past seven months, with a 94 percent success rate, Dr. Singh said.

               

“As a member of the Hazelden Betty Ford Patient Care Network, we will have access to resources, best practices, and most-effective treatment approaches that will be invaluable additions to our current care provided in the UTMC Adult Detoxification Inpatient Unit to aid our patients as they work toward a successful, long-term recovery,” said Dan Barbee, CEO of UTMC.

               

The foundation chose to work in Ohio with the University of Toledo Medical Center because of the opioid epidemic’s impact on the state, said Bob Poznanovich, executive director of national outreach and business development at Hazelden Better Ford Foundation.

               

“I’m seeing a pattern across the country where university medical centers are using more tactics to help with the fight against addiction,” Poznanovich said. “Ohio is one of the hardest hit states with the opioid epidemic, and we saw the need for help in the fight against addiction.”

               

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation presents their treatment methods to patients in the form of three big “buckets” of tools: emphasizing organizational techniques at the leadership level, providing clinical tools for clinical staff and providing patient and family tools for those in recovery, said Deb Newton, the foundation’s patient care network manager.

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